YDG Delegate, Isaac SelasieAhadzi reflects on an insightful article, “Understanding the Relationship Between Globalization and Terrorism” by Antoine Andary which explores the nexus between globalization and terrorism.

The natural world, as we know it, is markedly characterized by a system of balance. Day and Night, Darkness and Light, Good and Evil- there seems to be an inseparable tether often between contradictory forces which exist as the edges of the same double-edged sword. Thus, with the advent of globalization eliminating geopolitical barriers and spurring a harmonious inclusion of the many diverse cultures and nations across the globe, came an unprecedented rise in terrorism as its unruly bedfellow. The above-cited article sought to examine the fundamental causes of this phenomenon, existing measures to check its prevalence, as well as its implications on the future of geopolitics and world peace.

The author clearly captured the motivations of terrorists “to shock through cruelty in order to be publicized but also, and paradoxically, to be repressed and condemned in order to acquire, according to them, the legitimacy of the martyrs”, which stems from a strong reaction to the wind of globalization with all its Western cultural influxes. This laid the foundation of the author’s argument of societal dysfunction and lawlessness being the origin of this menace since they serve as hotspots for recruitment into terror networks. This is clearly evidenced by organized crime and gang operations in many neighbourhoods across the globe (like in Somalia, Liberia, the US, France, etc.) where security services deign to avoid.

However, the main drive of this increased wave of terrorism was identified as the internet despite its many benefits including “its unique suitability for sharing information and ideas”. This is because as this technology provided for the easy spread of globalization, it simultaneously facilitated the growth and promotion of extremist rhetoric and propagandist material and thus became an alternative training ground for terrorists. An example is how the Kouachi Brothers; the perpetrators of the January Paris attack in 2015, were radicalized and able to interact with and meet Djamel Beghal; the highest Franco-Algerian in the old structure of al-Qaeda without ever setting foot in the Middle East. Countless other stories and evidence of private chat rooms on the dark web used by terror networks for recruitments exist.

Progressively, the author further outlined some of the various strategies that have been designed for Preventing and Countering Violent Extremism (PCVE) by many organizations such as the United Nations Office of CounterTerrorism (UNOCT). This UN body provides capacity-building support to Member States and regional organizations on issues including developing national and regional PCVE action plans; prevention of radicalization to violence in prisons and rehabilitation and reintegration of violent extremist offenders; strategic communications to promote alternative and counter terrorist narratives; education and skills development for PCVE; and strengthening the role of parliamentarians in PCVE. All these remain relevant since they augment efforts of individual states to combat the continued spread of this phenomenon.

It is important to note, however, that an extensive stakeholder analysis is required to truly design and prescribe holistic measures to address these pockets of terrorism within their own cultural and social contexts. It would undoubtedly require international cooperation and support in order to balance out the scales and break the tethering of terrorism to the fast-paced advents of globalization and development.

By Isaac SelasiAhadzi

http://www.youngdiplomatsghana.org/blog/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/terrorism.jpghttp://www.youngdiplomatsghana.org/blog/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/terrorism-150x150.jpgadminblogFeature
YDG Delegate, Isaac SelasieAhadzi reflects on an insightful article, “Understanding the Relationship Between Globalization and Terrorism” by Antoine Andary which explores the nexus between globalization and terrorism. The natural world, as we know it, is markedly characterized by a system of balance. Day and Night, Darkness and Light, Good and...